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British makeup artist Alexandra Clare has never felt compelled to name one of her bold looks before, but "Bardot Eyes," as she calls her dramatically inverted smoky eye look taking over Instagram, demanded its own moniker. "I hadn’t seen the style before," she tells Allure. "To me, it reminded me of a top that I own that sits just below the shoulders known as a Bardot top, and so, clomid average number eggs Bardot Eyes were born."

The mesmerizing eye makeup is a revival of a look Alexandra Clare originally tried back in 2017. Over the years, she's refined a grungy style that she calls "smoky and quite full-on with lots of blending." 

With Bardot Eyes, Alexandra Clare believes the daring look offers up a way to do eye makeup that could easily be adapted to fit all different styles by creators in all areas of the makeup industry — and of course, anyone who's looking to try something new as we start to go mask-less more and more.

 

If the latter just so happens to be you, Alexandra Clare luckily shared tips with Allure for mastering Bardot Eyes. First, and foremost, do your foundation first before gathering up some tools: a gel liner, a thin eyeliner brush, and an eye shadow in the same shade, as well as a shadow in a hue that you want to blend the base into. 

Smith Cosmetics 202 Microliner Brush

In Alexandra Clare's case, she chose black as her base — particularly, the Melt Cosmetics Onyx Gel Liner and the brand's sold-out Muerte Palette — and pink shadow from Colourpop's Cloud Spun Palette as her secondary color to act as blush. 

From there, paint a line going from your lash line up to your temples, all the way to your hairline, Alexandra Clare says. Then, drag the pigment left on your brush downward toward the high points of your cheeks. Next, blend out the liner in the same direction with the coordinating shadow on a fluffy brush. 

"It’s a makeup that can look a little bit crazy until it all comes together at the end," Alexandra Clare notes. "So many people commented, 'This was really a trust-the-process moment.'" And finally, grab your blush or another color of eye shadow to make the transition from your eyes to cheeks more seamless and sleek. Finish off with some mascara, and you'll be good to go. 

For those not so into the punky aesthetic, look to beauty creator Anastasia Ayanwale (aka @aa.stasia). She experimented with a crisp green take on Bardot Eyes. "This look made me feel like myself again," Ayanwale tells Allure. "I haven't made content in quite a while due to not having the time and not being in the right headspace, so when I finished the look, I said to myself, 'There she is; I've missed you.'" She also notes she pulled color inspiration from Black beauty creators and makeup artists, like Wendy Asumadu, Betty Traore, Cherise, Michael Brooks, and @sandras.daughter. 

Ayanwale's technique is about the same as Alexandra Clare's. After completing her usual base makeup routine, Ayanwale focuses on her eyes, painting exaggerated wings with a green cream pigment — specifically the P Louise Coloured Base in Green With Envy. (Another good option is the Nyx Professional Makeup Vivid Brights Crème Color in Get Money.) 

Next, Ayanwale patted Ew from the NikkieTutorials x Beauty Bay Pressed Pigment Palette on top of the cream base with a flat eye brush. Then, she blended everything downward with a makeup sponge for a seamless finish. 

Pretty simple for a high-impact look, right? 

Nyx Vivid Brights Crème Colour

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