Leeds board’s latest Jesse Marsch sack view as replacements mentioned

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Leeds United are prepared to stand by Jesse Marsch for the time being in spite of the ongoing doubts over his long-term future at Elland Road, according to reports. The 48-year-old has seen his position as manager come under intense scrutiny in recent weeks, with Leeds currently in the Premier League’s bottom three after winning just two of their opening 11 matches.

The Yorkshire outfit spent in excess of £90million on new players over the summer but have struggled to improve their on-pitch fortunes in spite of their latest recruitment drive, with Marsch’s transfer strategy having been criticised in the weeks since the end of the window. His tactical approach has also come under fire as of late but it seems as though he will be given more time to turn things around before his superiors decide to wield the axe.

Those in power at Elland Road are prepared to back Marsch for the foreseeable future as Leeds aim to climb out of the Premier League’s drop zone as a matter of priority, according to Fabrizio Romano. It is said that the idea of replacing Marsch is not currently being considered by the club’s hierarchy, although a number of high-profile names have been tentatively linked with the job since the beginning of the campaign.

Sean Dyche, who kept Burnley in the Premier League on a shoestring budget for a number of years before he was sacked towards the end of last season, is among the managers to have been mentioned in connection with Leeds over the last few weeks. The 51-year-old would almost certainly be able to keep the Whites in England’s top flight but his appointment would run the risk of angering the club’s supporters, who grew accustomed to the slick brand of football utilised by Marcelo Bielsa during the latter’s time in charge.

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Former Rangers and Aston Villa boss Steven Gerrard has also been linked with the job at Elland Road and would be another divisive candidate if he is chosen to succeed Marsch in the not-too-distant future. He went out with a whimper at Villa Park earlier this month but has previously shown his mettle at a big club in Rangers, which could stand him in good stead to succeed at Leeds if he is trusted to manage them at some point further down the line.

A fairytale return to Yorkshire for Bielsa is another option to have been mooted in the media as of late, with the 67-year-old having established himself as a fan favourite during his previous spell in the dugout at Leeds. It seems unlikely that Bielsa would be overly keen on moving back to his former club, though, given the manner in which he was sacked last season and replaced by Marsch in almost no time at all.

The latter now appears to be facing the possibility of being replaced himself over the coming weeks, although Leeds are still adamant that the American coach is going nowhere as of yet. He was recently warned that he could have just days left to justify his position by former United States international Alexi Lalas, who offered his thoughts on the current situation at Leeds earlier this week ahead of their next match against Liverpool.

“When it comes to Leeds right now and Jesse Marsch, yeah, he is under pressure and rightfully so,” Lalas told The State of Union Podcast.

“Not because he is an American coach, but because he is a coach in a situation where they are trying to get somebody that can steady the ship and keep them in the league. I don’t know if and when they were to pull the plug but the shouts when it comes to fans out there have gotten loud.

“This could be the last week that we see Jesse Marsch. Even though Liverpool are not the Liverpool of old, it’s still Liverpool.”

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